EMERGING TALENT IN CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY

EXPOSURE

FITZROY 2017
 
   ACU GALLERY

13th - 27th JUNE

JURORS

Naomi Cass: (Director of Centre for Contemporary Photography)

Catherine Bell: (Artist and Senior Visual Arts Lecturer at ACU)

Heidi Romano: (Melbourne Photobook, Unless you will)

Lynette Letic, Let's Get Together, 2015.
(First Prize) 
Queensland College of Art

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‘Let’s Get Together’ is the result of multiple visits made to regional community dances, country

fairs and events that regularly take place in several small towns located west of Brisbane. Having

grown up in the city, and never ventured out into regional Queensland, I witnessed these

expressions of community for the first time. While I saw these events as part of the communities' attempts to uphold rituals, traditions and the narratives of their towns, I also considered the role of representation throughout the making of this work, and how photography allows for these disparate events and people to be construed as one collective identity — familiar, yet unfamiliar.

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Sophie Gabrielle, BL_NK SP_CE, 2015.
(Second Prize)  
Photography Studies College

Aesthetically driven and inspired by the physical molecular basis of memory itself captured by The Albert Einstein College of Medicine in early 2014, BL_NK SP_CE is an exploration into the abstract realm of memory. It is through memory that we base our identity, learning from our past experiences and influences.

 

Through self-portraiture and object the work creates a physical representation of the physiological workings of the mind, focusing on retained and recollective thought that have been confabulated over time and its effect on the subconscious. 

 

BL_NK SP_CE draws upon my continued interest in self-reflection, emotional and physical state, identity and psychology. 

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Lucy Foster, Hand for Gladness, 2016.
(3rd Prize)
Victorian College of the Arts

Driven by a profound engagement with photography, the nature of my practice touches on topics of presence and absence within time. Recently, I have been constructing 'scenes' via the layering of hand made prints, found photographs and various objects, which are then reconfigured through the process of reflection and re-photographing. The result unfolds a visual texture that breaches the surface, often evoking a sense of displaced portraiture... confusing what is real and what isn't.

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Guy Grabowsky, untitled, 2015-2016.  
Victorian College of the Arts 

This is a series comprising five photographs captured on 35mm film. Each photograph depicts a

representation of the familiar, meaning objects we interact with in everyday life. What each

photograph shares in common is the depiction of something that could be domestic and commonly

seen but not necessarily noticed. What the series comprises is a series of abstractions of the

familiar through the medium of the lens and camera (photography). Some of the photographs are

more obvious to identify than others, for example photograph 3 is a depiction of a window shutter

flipped on its side; others may be more difficult to identify, for example photograph 1 which is a light from a lamp captured in motion.

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Melissa Smith, String Series, 2016.
Deakin University 

This work ‘String Series’ is a carefully considered construction which was completely liberated from the formal aspect of the grid. With an assembled landscape I playfully began to explore the function of line, the behaviour of light and colour relationships. 

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Yen Nguyen, untitled, 2016. 
Queensland College of Art

This project marks the end of my studies in photography (specialising in creative advertising) at the Queensland of College of Art; therefore, I wanted to capture meaningful images that goes beyond its attractive facade. Drawing upon elements from fine art, fashion and the themes of wedding, I was able to come up with the idea of being ‘left at the altar’, which goes against mainstream representations of wedding events and focuses on the melancholic experience encountered when faced with a jilted lover. From the bridal wear to the large sets, I wanted to challenge myself so everything was personally made by me.

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Sam Foryth-Gray, untitled, 2016-2017. 
Photography Studies College

So far in my practice I've dealt mainly with more photojournalistic projects based off my immediate surroundings, however more recently my interests have been turning inward, and I'm more driven to explore issues surrounding my family history and my self in relation to that history. In my final year of study I'll be pushing myself to look past what is on the surface and to explore why I'm taking images - or being drawn to collecting them - and how this can be beneficial to me in my practice. A big part of my practice in recent times has been working with found material, something I've been drawn to for many years. I find the act of finding and unravelling these stories very exciting and creating new work both with the images and by responding to them is something I find interesting and captivating.

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Agata Krajewska, Transcience, 2016.
Australian Catholic University

In this project, I am particularly drawn to the exploration of landscapes and scenarios that are visually ambiguous and not easily recognisable. I see landscape as something that should be rather felt than perceived. Thus, I strive to immerse myself in experiencing the world around me, simultaneously trying to translate it into visual language. A photograph becomes an intuitive reaction to the feeling, an extended representation of it for the viewer to reinterpret for himself. I frequently use black and white aesthetics, low key images where a minimal number of elements are lit by light. By using this methodology, the time and place often become unidentifiable, allowing the viewer to project his story into the photograph and perhaps learn something new about himself from this relationship.

 

Through these experiences, I hope to evoke feelings of increased connection between world and self, conscious and unconscious, spiritual and bodily.​

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Lauren Dunn, 2016. 
Victorian College of the Arts

In this project, I am particularly drawn to the exploration of landscapes and scenarios that are visually ambiguous and not easily recognisable. I see landscape as something that should be rather felt than perceived. Thus, I strive to immerse myself in experiencing the world around me, simultaneously trying to translate it into visual language. A photograph becomes an intuitive reaction to the feeling, an extended representation of it for the viewer to reinterpret for himself. I frequently use black and white aesthetics, low key images where a minimal number of elements are lit by light. By using this methodology, the time and place often become unidentifiable, allowing the viewer to project his story into the photograph and perhaps learn something new about himself from this relationship.

 

Through these experiences, I hope to evoke feelings of increased connection between world and self, conscious and unconscious, spiritual and bodily.​

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Bianca Maher, In the beginning, 2016.
LaTrobe University

Sourcing images from old, discarded books, ‘In the Beginning’ examines the mistreatment of the environment through the hands of humanity. Experimenting with digital manipulation and layering of images, a dystopian world emerges. Human folly and greed has led to an exploited natural world. Fire and smoke serve as a warning of the inevitable ecological corruption. ‘In the Beginning’ discusses concern for the earth’s future, questioning if we have a shifting, disconnecting relationship with our environment. 

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Celeste Larkins, Melting Glaciers, 2016. 
RMIT

Melting Glaciers is a series of photographic images shot in the Nepalese Himalayas at the Ngozumpa Glacier. The photographs capture the effects of global warming in the region, as the glacier would once have been frozen over at that time of year. The colour emphasises what has become of humans indifference towards our environment and global warming. 

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Sinead Kennedy, To Set Fire To The Sea, 2016. 
RMIT

 Sinead Kennedy’s artistic practice holds an interest in photography and social issues. Her ongoing project, to set fire to the sea, is concerned with Australia’s policy of mandatory immigration detention. She practices a methodology where she is involved in various aspects of this experience with asylum seekers, and works in ‘expanded’ documentary photography in order to visualise the unphotographable. To set fire to the sea takes critical view of the arbitrary and inhumane system, and seeks the insight and reflection of individuals who experience indefinite detention. This work addresses this situation as it plays out in Australia, an already complicated site of migration and belonging, and questions how it interrelates with our national self-image. 

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Isaac Rollinson, _leave, 2017. 
Photography Studies College 

_leave explores change physically and mentally, and questions the reality we live in of which we try to make sense of.  interested in how we deal with everyday life, when we're living in a world of uncertainties and apparent truths.

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